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Myabetic was created to transform the diabetes image. After her own diagnosis, founder Kyrra Richards struggled to manage her blood sugar and confidence. She kept her diabetes secret because she was afraid to be associated with a negative stereotype. Kyrra created Myabetic to change this perception. Designed to improve the diabetes lifestyle, our products represent the strength and beauty of our community. Together, we will control our health with style.

 

 

On a family vacation to Disney World, my life was forever changed. As we drove from my home state of Arkansas to Florida for a week of fun with Mickey and friends, we had no idea what awaited us when we arrived. I was extremely irritable, rapidly losing weight, and stopping at gas stations every hour along the drive to use the restroom. Concerned, my parents took me to the nearest hospital, and at 5 years old - I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes.

 

One of the first challenges we faced was the general lack of knowledge surrounding diabetes. My mom was told that I could never have sugar again and that I would outgrow diabetes. If you have ever been told things like this when you or your child was first diagnosed, you know how scary and hurtful it is. Throughout the years I have learned that these moments, though challenging, give us opportunities to educate others. The only way people will begin to understand what we live with every single day is if we choose to share it with them!

 

 

 

On a family vacation to Disney World, my life was forever changed. As we drove from my home state of Arkansas to Florida for a week of fun with Mickey and friends, we had no idea what awaited us when we arrived. I was extremely irritable, rapidly losing weight, and stopping at gas stations every hour along the drive to use the restroom. Concerned, my parents took me to the nearest hospital, and at 5 years old - I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes.

 

One of the first challenges we faced was the general lack of knowledge surrounding diabetes. My mom was told that I could never have sugar again and that I would outgrow diabetes. If you have ever been told things like this when you or your child was first diagnosed, you know how scary and hurtful it is. Throughout the years I have learned that these moments, though challenging, give us opportunities to educate others. The only way people will begin to understand what we live with every single day is if we choose to share it with them!

 

 

At diabetes camp one year, my dad wrote me a note encouraging me to “celebrate my differences.” I remember crying because I couldn’t imagine feeling so different for my entire life. I rebelled against diabetes for a long time just to gain some normalcy. I’d go weeks without checking my BG, give insulin hours after I ate, and even had a hospital stay because of it. It’s so hard to go through this as a child or an adult, let alone to watch your own child experience it, but I promise it gets better.

After years of injections, different pumps, CGMs, and finger pricks, you reach a point where you just can’t handle being so different anymore. I grew up with a twin sister, and I always questioned, “Why me? Why do I have to go through life with this illness that makes me feel sick, causes me to wear a bunch of machines, and constantly reminds me that I am different?”

 

After years of injections, different pumps, CGMs, and finger pricks, you reach a point where you just can’t handle being so different anymore. I grew up with a twin sister, and I always questioned, “Why me? Why do I have to go through life with this illness that makes me feel sick, causes me to wear a bunch of machines, and constantly reminds me that I am different?”

 

At diabetes camp one year, my dad wrote me a note encouraging me to “celebrate my differences.” I remember crying because I couldn’t imagine feeling so different for my entire life. I rebelled against diabetes for a long time just to gain some normalcy. I’d go weeks without checking my BG, give insulin hours after I ate, and even had a hospital stay because of it. It’s so hard to go through this as a child or an adult, let alone to watch your own child experience it, but I promise it gets better.

 

I finally decided to accept and love my life with diabetes when I began to accept and love everything about myself. I found a community of people who understand what I go through every day and support me on my journey. I found a lifestyle that allows me to explore and create with no limitations. I found a man who encourages me to be the best version of myself and to never let diabetes get in the way of my dreams. I can finally look back and appreciate how much love and support my family gave me, and how important that was in keeping me alive and making me the woman I am today.

 

I finally decided to accept and love my life with diabetes when I began to accept and love everything about myself. I found a community of people who understand what I go through every day and support me on my journey. I found a lifestyle that allows

me to explore and create with no limitations. I found a man who encourages me to be the best version of myself and to never let diabetes get in the way of my dreams. I can finally look back and appreciate how much love and support my family gave me, and how important that was in keeping me alive and making me the woman I am today.

 

 

I have learned that having diabetes does make me different, but it also makes me stronger, more independent, more understanding, and so much else. I simply wouldn’t be who I am today without it. I am a rock climber, backpacker, girlfriend, daughter, dog and cat mom, singer, the list goes on. Diabetes does not define me, but I am so thankful for the opportunity to show people that even though it often makes me feel worse, in the end it makes everything about me much, much better.

I have learned that having diabetes does make me different, but it also makes me stronger, more independent, more understanding, and so much else. I simply wouldn’t be who I am today without it. I am

a rock climber, backpacker, girlfriend, daughter, dog and cat mom, singer, the list goes on. Diabetes does not define me, but I am so thankful for the opportunity to show people that even though it often makes me feel worse, in the end it makes everything about me much, much better.